• SIE@FSU

First Post: Charlie

Updated: Oct 21, 2019

On Thursday, June 13 our group went on an early morning herbal walk. Although this was one of the first days that it rained on us in Bali, I think that the experience we got out it was well worth a little drizzle. Up until this point, our group still had not seen any true rice paddies or large plots of land. Little did we know that we were about to be immersed in an environment of developed farming practices and acres of crops. As our guide began the tour, she started finding random plants on the side of the pathway that we were then given the chance to try. We were told that it was necessary to try everything she offered us on this walk to get the full experience. Sweet, sour, spicy, gooey, crunchy... there was no lack of different sensations from the plants that our wonderful guide gave us which, at times, made me happy for my big bottle of water. There were many people working on the crops going about their daily lives, even as rain came down harder and harder. Many of them gave us a huge smile and were extremely open to us being so involved in their daily work. As we walked further through this beautiful, swampy jungle, I could not help but be amazed by the authenticity of everything about this magical island. This herbal walk provided a certain level of genuine culture that you simply cannot find in many places. With our focus being on social entrepreneurship, it is crucial for us to understand every aspect of the culture as a whole in Bali in order to work with a lense of empathy. This walk provided a unique way of seeing what goes on in some of the deepest parts of Bali and was certainly an eye-opening experience that helped me grow in this field of work. I think that this visit was an integral part of the early stages of our trip and provided us with excellent examples of how the community in Bali continues to be efficient and sustainable in the long-run.