• SIE@FSU

First Post: Tonya

Updated: Oct 21, 2019

As my second week in Bali comes to an end, I have learned to find the beauty in not only my surroundings but within my conversations, relationships, and the strong bonds I've formed in my short time here. Within Balinese culture, there is a great emphasis placed on gratitude and the appreciation of living and nonliving things. I have since had the opportunity to see the reverence and importance of offerings, frequent celebrations and rituals that take place on this beautiful island. I have learned that within the dominant religions of Hinduism and Buddhism here in Bali, there are traditional offerings constructed by the Balinese consisting of a vibrant array of flowers, herbs and miscellaneous objects. Placed in a tray of bamboo leaves, lies an offering on almost every street corner. These offerings deserve the utmost respect as do the things that are given them. Whether it is a statue, a small boutique shop or even a bicycle, everyone and everything deserves our respect. A lesson we all can learn from is this belief of karma, what goes around comes around and the importance of harmony and balance is not a value taken lightly in Balinese culture. The Balinese philosophy of Tri Hita Karana or the three causes of prosperity signifies just that. Roughly translated to life, community, and the environment, the Balinese believe in the symbiotic relationship of these three elements. One cannot thrive without the other and as I’ve learned through the definition Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship one problem cannot be solved without solving another. In Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship, we must solve complex social/environmental problems systemically. This means that we address the need, collaborate if possible, and implement change with the resources available to us. I've learned from my experience thus far to appreciate my relationships and the environment I live in, maintaining balance and harmony in all aspects of my daily life.


Photo Creds: Nikki Ferrara